Tips Windows Platform

Creating a bootable USB drive

It’s always useful to have a bootable USB stick, it helps to get out of complicated situations and solve problems.

To create a bootable USB drive, the following steps must be followed:

Note: all the contents of your USB flash drive will be erased

  • Open command prompt : cmd
  • Run the command : DiskPart

Note: the Diskpart command can destroy a file system, it should be used with caution

DiskPart

  • A new window opens with the label: DiskPart >
  • List the volumes present on your system using the command: list vol
  • Select the volume of your USB drive using the command: select vol  < number of your volume >
  • Check that the correct volume is selected by using the command: list vol

Note: the selected volume will have an Asterix in front of it

  • Erase the contents of the volume using the command: clean
  • Select the volume of your USB drive using the command: select vol < number of your volume >
  • Check that the correct volume is selected by using the command: list vol

Note: the selected volume will have an Asterix in front of

  • Create a primary partition on the volume by using the command: create partition primary
  • Enable partition by using the command: Active
  • Format the partition in NTFS format using the command: format FS=NTFS
  • Open a command line window as Administrator: cmd
  • Change directory and access the boot directory located in the unzip ISO directory
  • Create the Bootmgr on the USB stick using the command: Bootsect /nt60 < letter of the USB disk >:
  • Copy all unzipped files from the Windows 7 ISO to the USB stick

Rufus Software

But if you aren’t that comfortable with MSDOS you can use RUFUS software

Rufus is a utility that helps format and create bootable USB flash drives, such as USB keys/pendrives, memory sticks, etc.

It can be especially useful for cases where:

  • you need to create USB installation media from bootable ISOs (Windows, Linux, UEFI, etc.)
  • you need to work on a system that doesn’t have an OS installed
  • you need to flash a BIOS or other firmware from DOS
  • you want to run a low-level utility